Cast bullet load data

R*taxpower said: Just a quick question here. If I have load data for a 125gr jacketed bullet, can I use the same data for a 125gr cast bullet?

d*nor said: No. What cartridge you are loading for?

R*taxpower said: No. What cartridge you are loading for? Darn! its a 9mm luger

t*grr said: Some may overlap a bit but for the most part the jacketed bullet will require more powder. For instance a 124 grain jacketed 9mm bullet, using wsuper-lit its 3.8 - 4.1 grains. Using a lead 124 grain bullet , using wsuper-lit its 3.4 - 3.8 grains It really depends on the caliber.

ml*htovaara said: Drop the charge a grain and see how it works. Usually with lead I will find out how low I can drop the charge with jacketed bullets, loading them lower and lower until they are as low as possible till the gun will just cycle reliably. Then I start at that really low load with the cast bullets trying to find a load that works reliably and is accurate, without too much leading. Good Luck

ph*shroy said: Like others mentioned. There is some overlap of jacketed and cast, mostly on the lower end of jacketed loads. If you have the Lee manual “modern reloading second edition” flip to page 157 it will show you how you can download from jacketed load data to cast bullet load data. Shooting cast bullets saves on the amount of powder you use which is another money saver Vs jacketed, not to mention the amount of savings compared to store bought ammo. happy shoot'en

s*nray said: Use the 125 grain LCN data on Hodgdon's site. Jacketed data usually drives a cast bullet too fast. That causes leading.

H4831 said: I am wondering why so many of you are reccommending a lighter charge than a jacketed charge, in a handgun? In any handgun, including the 357 and 44 mag, the same charge can be used for either jacketed or lead alloy. The only thing I would add here is a hot loading for a cast bullet may be a little high pressure for a jacketed.

ml*htovaara said: I am wondering why so many of you are reccommending a lighter charge than a jacketed charge, in a handgun? In any handgun, including the 357 and 44 mag, the same charge can be used for either jacketed or lead alloy. The only thing I would add here is a hot loading for a cast bullet may be a little high pressure for a jacketed. My reason would be that in both .357 and .44 mag I have experienced more leading when pushing lead with max loads. Now I know you are gonna say that I need to have bullets sized properly to my bore, but unfortunately when buying cheap hardcast off the shelf this isn't an option. I have found using lead for lighter plinking loads doesn't cause me much grief when cleaning. So I use lead for plinkers, and plated or jacketed when I want to load em hot. I could be completely off base but it works for me.

b*n hunchak said: I kinda believe the opposite, cast bullets allow you more velocity with reduced pressure when compared to jacketed bullets. For top velocities, use a properly sized bullet for your bore, and if in doubt use a gas check bullet. Any load that is safe with a jacketed bullet, will be less pressure with a cast bullet.

j*guar said: Google "9mm cast HS6" and you should find some loads to suit. HS6 seems to work fine with cast even in a friends Glock. Reference at least 2 unrelated sources and all safety steps for sure. Cheers Jaguar

R*taxpower said: Thanks all!


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