Listings for MEC RELOADING 12

Mec Reloader Crimp Starter Spindex Kit (12 Ga 6 & 8 Point NIB)
Mec Reloader Crimp Starter Spindex Kit (12 Ga 6 & 8 Point NIB)
   $12.39
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mec 600 jr versa mec 12 gauge reloading press
mec 600 jr versa mec 12 gauge reloading press
   $67.00
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MEC 600 JR 12 GAUGE SHOTSHELL RELOADER PRESS
MEC 600 JR 12 GAUGE SHOTSHELL RELOADER PRESS
   $69.99
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Mec Grabber 12 ga. progressive shot shell reloader  762R Refurbished
Mec Grabber 12 ga. progressive shot shell reloader 762R Refurbished
   $330.00
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Mec 600 Jr Mark V Die Set 12 Gauge Reloading Dies and Die Accessories: 845212
Mec 600 Jr Mark V Die Set 12 Gauge Reloading Dies and Die Accessories: 845212
   $82.59
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MEC 600 Jr Press  -  12 Gauge  Very Nice Press
MEC 600 Jr Press - 12 Gauge Very Nice Press
   $102.50
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MEC SHOTSHELL RELOADER 12 GA - MODEL #650
MEC SHOTSHELL RELOADER 12 GA - MODEL #650
   $124.99
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Mec 12 Gauge Case Conditioner Super Sizer
Mec 12 Gauge Case Conditioner Super Sizer
   $79.99
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MEC 650 RELOADING PRESS 12 GA
MEC 650 RELOADING PRESS 12 GA
   $149.99
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Mec Old school Star Crimp assembly Eight Point for 12 Gauge PT# 63412  Individua
Mec Old school Star Crimp assembly Eight Point for 12 Gauge PT# 63412 Individua
   $12.00
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MEC  Sizemaster SM82 Press - 12 Gauge With Brand New Pro Check
MEC Sizemaster SM82 Press - 12 Gauge With Brand New Pro Check
   $190.00
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Mec Reloader Primer Seat  Assembly 12Ga.  (progressive) New In Package
Mec Reloader Primer Seat Assembly 12Ga. (progressive) New In Package
   $14.49
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MEC Wad Guide Fingers 12 Gauge for MEC 600 Jr Pre-1982, 700
MEC Wad Guide Fingers 12 Gauge for MEC 600 Jr Pre-1982, 700
   $4.49
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New MEC E-Z PAK Shotshell Packer - 12 Gauge - B-15CA12
New MEC E-Z PAK Shotshell Packer - 12 Gauge - B-15CA12
   $16.69
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MEC 600jr MARK V 12ga SINGLE-STAGE SHOTSHELL RELOADER+BAR+BUSHINGS+
MEC 600jr MARK V 12ga SINGLE-STAGE SHOTSHELL RELOADER+BAR+BUSHINGS+
   $135.00
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Related MEC RELOADING 12 information

What calibers are not worth reloading for cost-savings?

rtr*cer13 said: Obviously, there is the advantage of making a more precise load for accuracy shooting.. but if you are reloading simply for costs savings (to shoot more :D) what calibers are not worth bothering with to save brass from old factory ammo? I'm sure this has been posted before, but I could not find it within 36 months from the search terms I entered.. but if its been done 1000 times before, my apologies in advance.

B said: Aside from Berdan primed brass it is pretty much all worth saving. Excluding rimfire of course.

JBD said: About the only one is 7.62 X 39 comparing surplus to reloads. Full metal jacket bullets reloaded cost more than surplus, cast a little cheaper than surplus. That is about it. Some folks will chime in that 9mm is not worth it. For me to make 9mm it cost. 40$ primers, 20$ for powder, bullets basically free (Cast Wheelweights) so 60 per Thousand.

m*rdig88 said: i reload 9mm and buy TMJ bullets. I still save a lot the only centerfire not worth reloading is 7.62x39 the savings will very but there will always be savings

d*wnwindtracker2 said: My buddy had a Mk-5 SMLE,wouldn't even bother to reload for it,C-tire sold the Winchester cheap enough. He has done enough reloading over the years to wear out a Rockchucker.

*utoftowner said: are you saying that your paying less that 40 cents a round at canadian tire?

bl*rgon said: As said, other than surplus, I don't think there is ANY cartridge that would be cheaper to buy factory ammo, instead of handloading...

jj*ckman said: 12ga can be pretty cheap although the really cheap stuff can be a little inconsistent, not to mention reloading equipment for shotshells is a little expensive.

*legs69 said: Reloading is not just about dollars and cents. It is also about time and effort. I will soon stop reloading 9mm. Hopefully. All centerfire rifle calibers are worth it IMO, except 7.62X39. Even then, some people get better accuracy in a non-corrosive package.

667 said: Reloading is not just about dollars and cents. It is also about time and effort. ...and having somewhere in the basement to hide from the wife and kids when they're gettin' on your nerves.:)

W*nnipeg Toymaker said: Also the pride when a mix turns out to be the "honey load" for your gun. It is great to have something to do when the wife is snoozing on the couch and you cannot watch TV. Just kidding....developing a load can be very interesting and fulfilling. i went from a "shotgun group " for my .223 to less than 1/4 inch at 100 yards. Quite an improvement.

*legs69 said: ...and having somewhere in the basement to hide from the wife and kids when they're gettin' on your nerves.:) My girlfriend lives in the same basement.:eek: So reloading is really not an escape.

bl*cksmithden said: ...and having somewhere in the basement to hide from the wife and kids when they're gettin' on your nerves.:) I've told the wife that I was going down to the man cave to reload some stuff when in actual fact, it was just for some peace and quiet. My room is pretty comfortable and doesn't really shun a woman with cob webs hanging down and stuff like that. Here's a tip. Scatter some sawdust on the floor just inside the door. I get this anyway from my woodworking. For some reason, to a woman, the thought of having sawdust in/on their socks and possible tracking some of it out of my room is like garlic and wooden stakes are to a vampire. They just won't cross the stuff !!!! She might knock on the door, but there's no way she'll come in. It's great !!!! I keep a pair of slippers just inside the door that I wear when I'm in there and take off before I step outside. There's no way in hell I'll ever totally clean the floor ROFL!!!!!

s*skcop said: I don't think you save money reloading 12 gauge or 7.62x39.

*ridan said: I was going to Williams Arms last Saturday, ready to get reloading supplies among other things. While driving, I did calculations in my head, and the cost of 9mm reload came out very close to buying factory ammo from Williams. After convincing myself, I bought 2,000 rounds instead of reloading supplies, along with a new pistol & other stuff. On my way back, I remembered that there are 50 rounds to a box, not 100... Meaning that reloads are 50% cheaper than factory ammo, which I new all along. Talk about mental f*rt! The most embarrassing thing is: I'm a programmer, math is what I do all day! :D

b*g boar said: I really enjoy reloading so it's more than just a cost thing though I know I save a bundle. I also cast (no pistols) and shoot 1000's every year. Adjusting a load up or down for recoil or accuracy, lots of diff loads to try out. I haven't bought factory in over 30years except for 22 and 12ga. I figured out that the only thing not worth doing is shotgun stuff for trap. I'd save about 50 cents a box, 2 cents each. I think I'll splurge.

C*ctus said: Buying supplies locally and not in huge bulk (500 fmj bullets for 90.00 and 1000primers for 32.00 and 1lb of powder for 32.00) I am saving 9.00 per box of 9mm almost half the cost. It will be less than half price once I start buying bulk supplies. The other benefit is to taylor the rounds to your needs as mentioned above. My reloads are a mid range powder load for paper punching which means more loasd per pound of powder. Cactus

*TOM said: ...and having somewhere in the basement to hide from the wife and kids when they're gettin' on your nerves.:) :cheers:

kj*hn said: Save money reloading? Hmm, that's a concept I've given very little consideration.:p Ahhh, just kidding! I recall sitting at the kitchen table loading 30-30 ammo with my Lee Loader, some 40 years ago. The odd primer would go off. My next big purchase was a Lyman Spar-T press from Casey's Reloading Supplies at Midland, ON. I bought a fair bit of stuff from him. Great service! Since then, well...... I probably have more stuff than the average bear, but I have fun. kj

g*rard said: I reload for every firearm that I have except 22 cal rimfire. You can save money by reloading for sure. Some you don't save much and some you save quite a bit. Casting your own lead bullets also save money. It's also a great way to pass time away. Reloading make more rifle more accurate.

fryk*sj said: Just a word of caution, DO NOT try to reload the Igmann 6.5x55 cartridges. Their Flash holes are too small, and they either grab on to your decapping pin and break it (Lee), or bend it and break it (everyone else). The 6.5x55's they make I regard as throw-away. I've used their 7.62x54R brass though, and have had no problems.

p210s*g said: Any .17 & .22 rimfire, 7.62x39 & 12 guage. These are all cheaper to buy factory or mil/surplus.

cycl*ne said: Any .17 & .22 rimfire, 7.62x39 & 12 guage. These are all cheaper to buy factory or mil/surplus. That's a pretty neat - and accurate - summary...:cheers:

j*e-nwt said: Just a word of caution, DO NOT try to reload the Igmann 6.5x55 cartridges. Their Flash holes are too small, and they either grab on to your decapping pin and break it (Lee), or bend it and break it (everyone else). The 6.5x55's they make I regard as throw-away. I've used their 7.62x54R brass though, and have had no problems. Can you save it and I'll pay for the shipping to send it to me?:)

fryk*sj said: Can you save it and I'll pay for the shipping to send it to me?:) I already gave it to a reloader friend, he still curses my name...

j*e-nwt said: Maybe you guys haven't refined all of your techniques and explored all of your options just yet.;) Anyway, if you get more, my offer stands.:)

HKM*rk23 said: As said, other than surplus, I don't think there is ANY cartridge that would be cheaper to buy factory ammo, instead of handloading... Wrong comparison though ! Can you reload 9mm TMJ for less than 22 1/2 cents apiece? That's what you can buy it for,,when its in stock :redface:. http://www.theammosource.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=178&zenid=msrfjqbk5a64ne50sek4oqtgk4

f*remachine69 said: Any "savings" you may have reloading, you'll end up shooting. ;) For the record, I've never had a primer go off. :p

HKM*rk23 said: There are no shortage of posts on CGN claiming very significant savings by reloading common calibres, 9mm, 45 ACP, .223 Rem, etc.. Occasionally these cite some pretty uncommon sources for component materials and/or some fairly extensive (for most) efforts. More commonly, prices for purchased ammo gets overstated by quoting NEW ammo priced in 50 rd boxes instead of more appropriately quoting commercially reloaded 1000 rd lots. This is accurately, what you get when you reload. Also commonly, setup costs for the reloader get way understated by omitting tools and other paraphernalia required. It doesn't end with the "starter kit" purchase. For the majority of new and experienced reloaders, who simply buy equipment and components from retail sources, then put the stuff together, for the common calibres, $$ saving is insignificant !! In the majority of cases you can't justify the capital outlay with the meagre cost saving of rolling your own. NOT to say you shouldn't reload!! If, however, frugality is your one and only motive, you are in for a disappointment with these calibres IMHO.

Q*igley said: Wrong comparison though ! Can you reload 9mm TMJ for less than 22 1/2 cents apiece? That's what you can buy it for,,when its in stock :redface:. http://www.theammosource.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=178&zenid=msrfjqbk5a64ne50sek4oqtgk4 Those are commercial "reloads" ...so wrong comparison again ...and yes...I can load 9 mil cheaper than $225 per k (and that's 9 major using Vit powders)

D*gleg said: I think I lost money loading 12 gauge. With rifle cartridges the cost savings per box can be huge. My favorite example is my .416 Rigby, factory ammo approaches $200 a box while handloads are more like $40 using the best of everything.Practice loads are alot cheaper. Handloading is about accuracy, availability and performance. When all the part boxes of bullets, half cans of powder and all that test ammo is factored in, I'm sure that I lose money on most of the cartridges I load.

HKM*rk23 said: With rifle cartridges the cost savings per box can be huge. My favorite example is my .416 Rigby, factory ammo approaches $200 a box while handloads are more like $40 using the best of everything.Practice loads are alot cheaper. Likewise with my .338 LM. Thats what got me started. Handloading is about accuracy, availability and performance. Bingo! That IS what its all about, You can't get ammo tuned to your rifle by buying it off the shelf or readily available JHP or JSWC for your pistol either. Many many good reasons to reload exist other than penny pinching but when you can save $4.00 per round or more loading .416 Rigby, .338 LM, and others, yep you'll pay for your gear damn quick ;).

th*bigslide said: Just a word of caution, DO NOT try to reload the Igmann 6.5x55 cartridges. Their Flash holes are too small. Can you not uniform the flash hole?

fryk*sj said: Can you not uniform the flash hole? Sure you can, after you break all your decapping pins removing the primers...:D

c*rtmg said: Sure you can, after you break all your decapping pins removing the primers...:D What about a decapping only die, with a decapper turned down for size a couple thousandths? Just a thought, possibly one you've already tried, maybe it didn't work, maybe it's not and it might work. Also, to the Original Question, if you want hunting ammo, for your 7.62x39, it's cheaper to reload. But for just blasting, forget about anything but the cheap stuff.

*driel said: 40mm HE. A real bugger to seat with the LEE Classic hammer die set.

C Br*ad Arrow said: When prices started escalating a couple of years ago...not to mention how hard it was to find factory 9mm and 223,... the savings have increased dramatically.

j*e-nwt said: What about a decapping only die, with a decapper turned down for size a couple thousandths? Just a thought, possibly one you've already tried, maybe it didn't work, maybe it's not and it might work. S.T.F.U! How am I supposed to get cheap 6.5 brass now! :eek:Mind your own flippin' business, buster! ;)

c*rtmg said: S.T.F.U! How am I supposed to get cheap 6.5 brass now! :eek:Mind your own flippin' business, buster! ;) Oops, where's the "cat out of the bag" smilie? cp:

*asyrider604 said: Reloading is a hobby in itself. You will save in terms of cost per shot, obviously. However, like many have said before, you will spend more in absolute terms because you will definitely shoot more.

J*hn Y Cannuck said: Like others have said, shotgun is the one you don't save a lot on.

D*n Doucette said: Reloading is a hobby within a hobby I would just like the shortage of supplies problem to go away. My LGS rations primers as they want to be able to have some for each of their customers and getting brass and some bullets is tricky too. It's like having a vehicle you can't get fuel for...f:P: I try to reload for everything I shoot but I am having an especially good time developing a .223 load.

Cl*ybuster said: Like others have said, shotgun is the one you don't save a lot on. Unless it's 28 gauge or .410. ;)

Ltb*ll01 said: 338 Lapua!

h*kx said: Reloading will always be more economical. Once you are initially tooled up, its is just a matter of another set of dies. A lot of loads share common components (powder / primers etc). I would NEVER get into bullet swagging. That's way beyond my budgetary restraints.

sh*llriv said: Shotgun is worth while in 410,28,16,20 and 12g specailty loads can save 30%

J*ff000 said: Buying supplies locally and not in huge bulk (500 fmj bullets for 90.00 and 1000primers for 32.00 and 1lb of powder for 32.00) I am saving 9.00 per box of 9mm almost half the cost. It will be less than half price once I start buying bulk supplies. The biggest cost for me when thinking about reloading is TIME! My time is pretty expensive. Mind you I don't and won't be shooting any of the big cost ammo.

p*ntcanna said: I feel that you learn things by reloading (about each component, ballistics, etc) that you would never get just shooting commercial ammo.

J*ff000 said: I feel that you learn things by reloading (about each component, ballistics, etc) that you would never get just shooting commercial ammo. Something like 9mm though ballistics don't really matter, just the velocity and bullet weight, and that could be had factory ammo. My 22-250 I'll reload next year probably. Not really for the cost savings, more for like you said, learning and getting the most from my gun.

c*ncer said: If you're happy with Wolf Reloaded Ammunition (I am!), then reloading for most common pistol calibres doesn't seem worthwhile. I suppose if you have plenty of time on your hands it's still a hair cheaper... unfortunately I definitely do not have all that spare time.